Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

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sand dollar with epiphytes

 

08/23/17

The following topics are under investigation at SMS by Smithsonian scientists:

Thomas Sauvage, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
Funded by Georges E. Burch Postdoctoral Fellowship
PROJECT: Elucidating terpene biosynthetic genes in the chemically-defended invasive genus Caulerpa (Ulvophyceae, Chlorophyta)

Jennifer Sneed, Justin Campbell, and Valerie Paul, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
Funded by POR 2016-7 from Mote Marine Laboratory
Project: Assessing the differential responses of two CCA species to ocean acidification and increased seawater temperature with implications for natural reef restoration.
Abstract: The objective of this project is to understand how ocean acidification (OA) and increasing surface seawater temperatures (SST) will impact the growth, physiology and microbiomes of crustose coralline algae (CCA) species with implications for coral recruitment. Crustose coralline algae are critical components of healthy coral reef ecosystems.  They aid in reef accretion and stabilization, create habitat for other organisms, contribute to carbon sequestration and are important settlement substrata for a number of marine invertebrates including many coral species. 

Steven Canty, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
Funded by: Oceans 5
Project: Improving Small Scale Fisheries Surveillance, Enforcement and Expanding Marine Reserves for the Mesoamerican Reef

Steven Canty, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
Funded by: Summit Foundation
Project: Science to Enable Marine Conservation in the Mesoamerican Reef

Steven Canty, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
Funded by: Global FinPrint / Paul Allen Foundation
Project: Assessing elasmobranch populations along the Honduran north shore

Michael J. Boyle, Valerie Paul, Dean Janiak, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce; Matthieu Leray (STRI) and Gustav Paulay (UF)
Funded by Smithsonian Institution, Global Genome Initiative Peer Award
PROJECT: Marine Invertebrate Diversity in the Fort Pierce Inlet and Beyond

Karen J. Osborn (NMNH-IZ), Michael J. Boyle, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce, and co-PIs from NMNH-IZ
Funded by Smithsonian Institution, Track-Two Research Grant from the Associate Director for Science and GGI
PROJECT: STREAMCODE: Planktonic Diversity of the Gulf Stream

Ilka (Candy) Feller, John Parker, Richard Osman, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center and Daniel Grunar, University of Maryland
(4 years funded by NASA to study mangrove invasion of salt marshes as climate changes)
PROJECT: SENSITIVITY OF COASTAL ZONE ECOSYSTEMS TO CLIMATE CHANGE

Sarath Gunasekera, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
PROJECT: Isolation, Identification and Quantitative Analysis of the Toxic Secondary Metabolites Associated with Cyanobacteria Lyngbya spp. Blooms in Florida

Whitman Miller et al (including Valerie Paul)
(Funded as a Smithsonian Grand Challenge)
PROJECT: Tracking Ecological Change from Ocean Acidification across Latitudes using Autonomous Monitoring and Manipulative Field ExperimentsAbstract: Because of their relative shallowness and reduced salinity and alkalinity, coastal marine habitats and estuaries are inherently less buffered to changes in pH than is the open ocean, making them prone to CO2‐induced changes in pH. Despite their natural variability in pH and pCO2, increases in atmospheric CO2 will likely create a shifting baseline for environmental variability, much more complex than is expected in the open ocean. To date, no studies have focused on measuring and under-standing the complex nature of carbonate chemistry dynamics in coastal systems, especially at spatial and temporal scales that are ecologically relevant to the biota that inhabit such locations. We propose a cross SI unit/cross latitudinal coastal ocean acidification monitoring network which will have two components: 1) collection of continual, long term pCO2, pH, and total alkalinity data at SERC, SMS, and STRI to track acidification dynamics across latitudes and habitat types and; 2) use of O2‐enrichment systems to conduct in‐situ field experiments that will test for the ecological effects of acidification on organisms, species interactions, and community assembly. This research program will represent the first ever coordinated monitoring of ocean acidification in coastal ecosystems directed explicitly at ecological scales.

Valerie Paul, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
PROJECT: Ecological Roles of Marine Natural Products  

Valerie Paul, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
PROJECT: The Impact of Macroalgae on Coral Recruitment

Valerie Paul, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
PROJECT: Ecology and Long-Term Monitoring of the Indian River Lagoon

Jessica Lunt, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
Funded by the US Army Corps of Engineers
PROJECT: CERP: Benthic Infaunal Monitoring of the St. Lucie Estuary and the Southern Indian River Lagoon

Valerie Paul and Sarath Gunasekera, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
Funded by the University of Florida
PROJECT: Novel Targeted Anticancer Agents from Marine Cyanobacteria

Valerie Paul, Dean Janiak, Jessica Lunt, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
Funded by the St. Johns River Water Management District
PROJECT: Reconnaissance of Infauna and Epifauna in the Northern IRL System

Mary E. Rice, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
PROJECT: Life Histories of Marine Invertebrates

Jennifer Sneed, Justin Campbell and Valerie Paul, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
Funded by POR-2013-27 from Mote Marine LaboratoryProtect Our Reefs license plate
PROJECT: Can corals survive a 1-2 punch? Combined impacts of ocean acidification and macroalgae on coral health and recruitment.
The overall goal of this project is to determine how corals are likely to respond to the increasing presence of macroalgae on reefs under high pCO2 conditions predicted to occur within this century in order to provide information that management agencies can use to develop effective strategies.  Within this project we are investigating not only the impacts of these stressors on the health of the adult coral colonies, but also on the settlement success of the larvae and on the microbial communities involved. Taking a multi-faceted approach to this problem allows for a broader understanding of how these stressors will impact coral reefs and gives more detailed information to managers and conservationists in their attempt to save these critical ecosystems.

Max Teplitski, University of Florida/Smithsonian George Burch Fellow
Funded by Mote Marine Laboratory
PROJECT: Disruption of the Black Band Disease

Protect Our Reefs license plate

Max Teplitski, University of Florida/Smithsonian George Burch Fellow and
Valerie Paul, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
Funded by Mote Marine Laboratory
PROJECT: Defining the Coral Microbiome Trajectory Leading to the Black Band Disease

Ana Tronholm and Valerie Paul, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
Funded by Mote Marine Laboratory
PROJECT: Who Is Taking Over Coral Reefs? Assessing Biodiversity of the Ecologically Important Brown Algal Order Dictyotales in the Florida Reef Tract

 

 


Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
701 Seaway Drive, Fort Pierce, Florida 34949
Phone 772-462-6220, Fax 772-461-8154

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